Monday, November 17, 2008

Across the Atlantic



Number (N)ine wool-alpaca Cowichan sweater, $1,695 at Barneys New York; tattersall cotton shirt, $425 at Bergdorf Goodman; Patrik Ervell pleated cashmere pants, $700 at Opening Ceremony; cotton bandana, $12 at Jean Shop.

There is something almost imperceptibly interesting about this recent Americana editorial from The New York Times: Dress Codes, Looking Good: The Sequel.



Leather coat with shearling-lined hood, $1,595 at Emporio Armani; Scandinavian print cashmere crew neck, $547 at Paul Stuart; cotton shirt, $330, and slim-leg wool pants, $570, both at Marc Jacobs; Michael Bastian Shetland wool tie, $180 at Bergdorf.

You will notice the bold contrasting of colors.



Wool-alpaca patch-pocket jacket, $1,130 at Marc Jacobs; Thom Browne tattersall oxford shirt, $350 at Bergdorf; Hanro cotton tank top, $78 at underwear-options.com; printed silk scarf, $295 at Yves Saint Laurent; Black Fleece wool trousers, $900 at Brooks Brothers; duck boots, $85 at L. L. Bean.

The mix of fabrics with different textures. The nonchalant but obviously bohemian insertion of details such as bandanas.



Michael Bastian striped cotton tank, $252 at michaelbastiannyc.com, and wrap cardigan, $1,195 at Saks; Dries Van Noten wide-leg wool-cashmere pants, $555 at Barneys; cashmere cable-knit scarf, $1,330 at Tom Ford.

Contrasts again, but this time against an exquisite scarf.



Shawl-collar wool sweater, $98, and striped barrel-cuff cotton shirt, $125, both at Banana Republic; Michael Bastian cashmere weave tie, $185 at Bergdorf; Band of Outsiders corduroy trousers, $520 at Barneys; orange leather belt, $5 from a street vendor; leather messenger bag, $495 at J. Crew; "Jones" black plastic frames, $195 at A.R. Trapp Opticians.

The $5 belt bought from a street vendor is a sweet surprise.



Bamford & Sons cashmere fisherman sweater, $1,195 at Barneys; Band of Outsiders tartan quilted vest, $445 at Opening Ceremony; Phineas Cole checked wool trousers, $484 at Paul Stuart; wool toggle coat, $400 at Banana Republic; Michael Bastian fingerless wool gloves, $240 at Bergdorf; socks, $00 at Paragon Sports; duck boots, $85 at L.L. Bean; "Fiction" tortoise plastic frames, $220 at A.R. Trapp.

This look could have been assembled from the separate wardrobes of five highly opinionated people. Together, the pieces belong to a highly confident and sly sophisticate.



Tweed wool overcoat, $1,930, striped cardigan, $930, and wool pants, $420, all at Etro; Black Fleece striped cotton shirt, $150 at Brooks Brothers; suede belt, $255 at Yves Saint Laurent; Michael Bastian knit scarf, $465 at Scoop.



Band of Outsiders two-button corduroy sports jacket, $1,610, tartan cashmere sweater vest, $710, striped cotton oxford shirt, $225, and silk tie, $125, all at Barneys; Black Fleece cable-knit wool sweater, $350 at Brooks Brothers; leather messenger bag, $588 at Il Bisonte.

I have to concede and admit that I have never imagined American dressing like this.



The solidity of mood produced by the editorial above can carry itself well when compared with this Menswear magazine 2007 holiday shoot, No Sun in Venice, where emotions carry their own shadows.





Instead of sunlight, there is the dark of unsaid words and unexpressed confessions.





The two editorials seem to stand for light and darkness, America and Europe, modernity and tradition, besides of course, day clothes and night wear.





I think both shoots are exquisite, though in a different respect.





Editors and stylists merely have to breathe the air of their chosen settings, cities, continents. The clothes usually follow.







"No Sun in Venice" images from Model Hommes

Saturday, November 15, 2008

Best dressed band



In spite of what magazines have said about rising bands and their sartorial identities and image building wardrobe, I pick The Cardigans, but not in general; only in their Erase Rewind video. (Googling them, I found some horrible things.)



I think I watched this way back when I cared less for fashion. It stuck in my mind for three reasons: they all died in the end, they all looked good, and the song was great.




Maybe I'd change my mind if only I listened more to the punk/post-punk bands that insist on sticking to suits. Maybe there was something with dark hued clothing against a white backdrop.



Watch the video and decide. I stick to my verdict.

Friday, November 14, 2008

Nouk B, 21, from Germany



These first six pictures come from Nouk's Lookbook page. We've talked about him before.

1. GLASSES, $1, FLEAMARKET 2. COAT, $30, SOME EMBARRASING STORE 3. POLO, $5, H&M 4. BOW, $2 5. CARDIGAN, FROM MY FRIEND LEONIE 6. BLACK SKINNIES, $20, H&M



1. ORIGINAL OLDSCHOOL PUMAS, $2, FLEEMARKET 2. GLASSES , $1, FLEEMARKET 3. BROWN SHIRT, GITF THRIFT 4. BROWN SHOWLACE BOW, 0,50 € 5. BROWN PULLOVER, 0,50€ FLEEMARKET 6. BROWN SKINNIES, $20, H & M 7. BROWN GLOVES, $1, CARITAS SECOND HAND



1. BABY BLUE LEVIS, $6, SECOND HAND 2. BOWTIE 3. WHITE SLIM CUT SHIRT, $30, ZARA 4. REVERSIBLE!! BLAZER!!, $5, BOGNER GERMANY, IN THE RED CROSS STORE



1. SCARF, €2, SECOND HAND 2. BROWN CARDIGAN, €1, RED CROSS STORE 3. BROWN V NECK TSHIRT, €1, RED CROSS STORE 4. BROWNISH GREY SKINNIES, €20, H & M 5. THE BEST BAG ON EARTH, FREE FREE FREE. AN OLD LADY I HELPED, WANTED TO THROW IT AWAY 6. SHOES, FROM SPAIN



1. SKINNY TIE, $5, H & M 2. SCARF, FROM MY GRAN 3. DARK GREY CARDIGAN, FROM MY FRIEND LEONIE 4. BLACK VEST 5. BLACK SKINNIES , $20, H & M 6. VINTAGE GLASSES, $3, FLEEMARKET 7. ARMY BAG, OUT OF THE TRASH 8. WHITE POLO, $2, HUMANA SECOND HAND STORE 9. COAT, $12, SECOND HAND BOGNER 10. SHOES, $10, DEICHMANN



1. SELFMADE CAPE, $6 2. WHITE 70´S POLO, $2, THRIFTED 3. SCARF BLACK, $3 4. SUSPENDERS BLACK, $3, THRIFTED 5. BLACK SKINNY JEANS , $20, H & M

Besides being stylish, Nouk is quite the vintage expert. The secret, of course, is to mix the old, the new, and the handmade.



If you're wondering how he can churn out such excellent pictures, these images from his flickr account will tell you that Nouk is also a very good photographer.



His images show how he has used self-portraits to show various personalities.



If you'll go camwhoring, might as well look good doing it.

Wednesday, November 12, 2008

Drawn home



Drawn home
By Miguel Paolo Celestial
Published in WestEast Magazine 25: Home, Fall 2008

A bed, a chair, and a window. Home is where we rest and where we dream even without mattresses and pillows. It is where our thoughts dwell, where days are measured by shadows, movement by rooms, and resolve by pauses between supper. Home is where the night dwindles, shaking the thick smell of dusk that glistens in our vision. There is no frame for our gaze towards tomorrow; home is wherever hope is nailed to our heart’s rafters.


"Remains of the Day" editorial from GQ Style 7: The Great British Male, Fall/Winter 2008. Photographed by Nathaniel Goldberg, styled by David Bradshaw.

Silk pajamas, Prada



Home. There must be more to it than the yearning for a place or a moment that could seal us off from the hectic demands of life, where we can shut out problems and curl into a long-sought sense of quiet. There must be more to it than the appeal of bearable routine and the safety of predictability. What is it about the concept of home that drives us on journeys just to find it? What makes it the sum of all our goals if not their reason?

Silk pajama top from a selection, Lanvin



At first mention, we think of home as a tin full of tokens we have brought back from our travels. A collection of little things like randomly pocketed pebbles, together with furniture and art, novelties and design pieces. It is a wall where we pin maps of past voyages and plot succeeding conquests, a den stashed with memories to be relived and shared.

Striped cotton pajamas, Ermenegildo Zegna



Home is waking up to smooth out rumpled sheets, clear our minds with coffee or tea, and listen to the first rustlings of the morning. Home is rising beside your loved one. In the evening, it is that glance around your neighborhood right before you turn your back, bolt the gate, and retreat into private living.

Silk pajamas from a selection, Giorgio Armani



Home is the entire length of an afternoon; to it we surrender the loose ends of our days. It is every part of a house and its surroundings as well as any place that our laughter and sighs inhabit. No matter how long and involving our adventures have been, there’s no place quite like it...

Cotton pajamas, Hawes & Curtis



Silk pajamas, Tom Ford

This editorial takes off from Dolce and Gabbana's pajama suits presented for Spring/Summer 2009. Read the full article

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Of camels and editorials



From Details. CAMEL COATED: Photographs by Thomas Schenk

Suit and shirt by CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION. Tie by MISSONI. Shoes by CHURCH'S.

Camel hair clothing or camel-colored apparel comprise two editorials, respectively, from the August 2008 issue of Details and the Fall/Winter release of Fantastic Man. Notice the difference not only in the styling and photography, but also in the language of the text.



Jacket by TOMMY HILFIGER. Scarf by APC.



Clothing by POLO RALPH LAUREN. Belt by YVES SAINT LAUREN.



Clothing by BOSS SELECTION. Shoes by CHURCH'S.



MISSONI.



ISAAC MIZRAHI.



GIORGIO ARMANI.



Clothing by VALENTINO. Shoes by CHURCH'S.

Styling by Paul Stura, hair by Johnnie Sapong using Aveda Men, makeup by Charlotte Day for See Management.



From Fantastic Man. CAMEL GALORE: The multi-layered allure of a neck-to-toe camel outfit, edited by Jodie Barnes and photographed by Paul Wetherell.

Who knew there were this many shades of camel? There is so much green in the TOM FORD cashmere camel double-breasted coat to almost slip it off the camel chart. Here, it's worn on top of a brown-ish GIORGIO ARMANI herringbone suit jacket, a more oatmeal POLO RALPH LAUREN camel cashmere poloneck and a reddish camel silk scarf by LANVIN, which is tied here as a cravat. Meanwhile the gold in these POLO RALPH LAUREN camel trousers really shines through.



Wow, look at the orange of those JUNYA WATANABE camel cords! They are part of a look that is more modern man than (its) neighbor (on top). The CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION wool coat is treated with plastic and has a narrower lapel, while the classic camel suit-jacket by LANVIN is of a short length. Underneath, the caramel coloured poloneck is by BOSS BLACK, while the gold CARTIER watch is as close to camel as you can get in a timepiece.


Details only succeeds in one outfit: the one with Polo Ralph Lauren denim. In an effort to tone down the camel hair, the other combinations have only become slack and boring. Fantastic Man conquers the fabric with panache.

This is also what I mean when I said that Fantastic Man is more personal. Though the approach is conceptual - hence the color scheme - it welcomes the reader, while the images from Details appear more like shopfront installations that have the potential to assault passersby.

The absence of the model's personality allows room for the reader to project himself into the clothes, and the accompanying text offers usable information, and yes, even insight.

Wow indeed.

Monday, November 10, 2008

Toledo and Toledo



Toledo and Toledo
By Miguel Paolo Celestial
Published in Rogue Magazine, November 2008

There are the usual and now common collaborations between visual artists, fashion designers, architects, and interior and industrial designers, lasting only one or several seasons. Usually the convergence is pure business: to expand the visual language of a brand or to search for new synergies between disciplines to push their limits. The conversation that takes place is often times terse, limited, and in terms of relationships, fixed.



Then there are the rare marriages of heart, mind, and creative sensibility. These blessed occurrences happen less between corporations than between talented individuals, and in the case of artist Ruben Toledo and fashion designer Isabel Toledo, between actual spouses.



Their creative fusion has spanned two decades and covers fashion design, painting, illustration, and even sculpture.



Ruben has designed perfume bottles, mannequins, award statuettes, store windows, scarves, fabrics, dishes, and carpets. He has painted portraits, murals, and album covers...



(Ruben Toledo) is married to fashion not only because he illustrates for brands and magazines, but also because his dreams inspire the clothes of his designer wife, Isabel, who in turn inspires him as his muse. The Toledos are each other’s creative sustenance and are together an artistic force...



Incidentally, Isabel also designs her husband's clothes, lending the minute idiosyncracies she is known for.

Read the full article